London Fashion Week goes sustainable & more news: transparency roundup

From the UK’s Modern Slavery Act to the rise of startup brands with open price breakdowns, transparency is an important movement affecting marketing, branding, supply chain and core business strategy for consumer goods brands all over the world.

As the market leaders in tech-powered transparency, each week the Provenance team selects our picks of the most impactful and insightful news stories.

We are creating an-depth guide on how to make transparency a competitive advantage for your business. Sign up here to receive early access.

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Luxury fashion puts sustainability front and centre at London Fashion Week

(Source: fashionmagazine.com)

High street brands have been aware for some time of the issues around labour and environmental standards in their supply chains with transparency now clearly on the agenda. London fashion week made sustainability part of the conversation this year by banning fur, having a screening of ‘The True Cost’ by Annie Lennox and having a ‘100% sustainable’ opening party.

Why we find this interesting:

We’re seeing many designers and fashion brands pay more attention to their sourcing, with shoppers increasingly asking #WhoMadeMyClothes. But luxury brands are still catching up. London Fashion Week helps to set the tone for the year to come: we hope this will accelerate the rate of change in the broader industry.

– Laura Burnett, Community Manager, Provenance

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UK shopper attitudes to food will no longer be dictated by price

(Source: Thought Works)

A new study in September 2018 by Thought Works has shown that in the next decade 62% of the 2000 shoppers surveyed throughout the UK would prioritize reduced packaging and recyclable materials over price for their food purchases. A third of the shoppers surveyed would place more importance on where food comes from and if it has been ethically sourced from a sustainable supply chain. This reinforces the findings from Unilever’s 2017 international study of 20,000 adults that found a third of shoppers are now choosing to buy from brands they believe are doing social or environmental good.

Why we find this interesting:

In a future where price becomes a less impactful lever, brands and retailers are going to have to think differently about the products they design and the way they buy to meet customer’s future needs.

– Louise Garvin, Head of Projects, Provenance

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Listen to why slavery isn’t an issue of the past, it’s buried in the supply chains we buy from

(Source: Marks & Spencer)

Last year only 6% of British managers surveyed by Chartered Institute of Procurement and Supply were certain their supply chain was free of slavery. A podcast discussion between Louise Nicholls, Marks and Spencer’s Corporate Head of Human Rights, and David Camp, founder of Stronger Together, is a timely reminder of just how important an issue this is and gets to the heart of who makes our products. Well done M&S!

Why we find this interesting:

The fact that slavery is so prevalent in modern supply chains and consumers don’t know is unacceptable. Shoppers will increasingly demand that they know slavery is not in their supply chains and brands that can demonstrate this transparency will be the most trusted.

– David Pepper, Project Trado lead, Provenance

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