The results of a national referendum on ‘fair food’ laws: transparency roundup

From the UK’s Modern Slavery Act to the rise of startup brands with open price breakdowns, transparency is an important movement affecting marketing, branding, supply chain and core business strategy for consumer goods brands all over the world.

As the market leaders in tech-powered transparency, each week the Provenance team selects our picks of the most impactful and insightful news stories.

We are creating an-depth guide on how to make transparency a competitive advantage for your business. Sign up here to receive early access.

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Sustainable Development Goals aren’t converting business ambition into action

(Source: Oxfam)

A new Oxfam discussion paper this September highlights how even though Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) have been widely adopted, it has proven difficult to surface evidence around what businesses are doing to achieve them. The public information available from 76 of the world’s largest companies shows that just over 60% have committed to SDGs yet only half have translated that into new actions.

Why we find this interesting:

With consumers unable to see action behind Sustainable Development Goals there’s a risk that they become purely a communications tool for businesses, contributing to further ‘greenwashing’. Being able to see and trust that businesses are taking real action is paramount to maintaining the integrity of SDGs.

– Harini Manivannan, Project Carbon Chain lead, Provenance

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Switzerland’s citizens consider ‘fair food’ laws in national referendum

(Source: BBC)

The proposal called for more sustainable, animal friendly products with more detailed labelling. In a country where 14% of all farmland is organic, polls pointed to 70% support for the proposal. Ultimately a government campaign around potential effects of price rises meant 60% voted to reject proposal but the issues remain a source of discussion nationally.

Why we find this interesting:

Even though the proposals were rejected it shows that ethical and sustainable considerations are reaching a level of national conversation and that increasingly governments as well as businesses will be key actors in this conversation.

– Dolly Eniola, Digital Product & Service Designer, Provenance

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Shoppers consider ‘free-from’ claims on labels healthier, regardless of actual health benefits

(Source: Food Matters Live)

Food Matters Live have looked at an online survey conducted by the European Food Information Council in 2016 with 2,000 shoppers across UK, Poland, France & Sweden. It found that all ‘free-from’ claims on labels (e.g. palm oil, GMO, additives etc.) carried a healthier perception regardless of whether there was actual health benefits. Up to 35% of respondents were willing to pay a premium. However when respondents were told that some ‘free-from’ claims may not always mean healthier, those in Poland & France felt reduced trust in these types of claims whereas those in UK & Sweden were generally ‘not surprised’.

Why we find this interesting:

Despite recent attempts to make food labelling clearer and more understandable for the shopper, there is still some way to go before food labelling can call itself transparent to the point where shoppers can feel fully informed and confident in their product choices.

– Simon l’Anson, Head of Design, Provenance

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